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The Last Time (Club Mix)



Now that 2020 is officially knocking at our door, DJ Times has taken the time to handpick the 50 tracks the defined this decade in music, which features a boatload of timeless tunes, festival weapons, radio fan-favorite and a bunch of gems you probably forgot about.




The Last Time (Club Mix)


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ALABAMA & Friends commemorates that summer at The Bowery and catalogues the lasting influence the group has had on generations of Country stars who draw inspiration from the sparkling harmonies, irresistible stage presence and world-class songwriting and song selection that made them superstars. It brings together some of Country's biggest stars, each bringing a unique musical approach to classic ALABAMA songs that have influenced them.


"We kicked off the tour in Myrtle Beach and took our music back to our fans," adds Jeff. "We've all done enjoyable projects separately in the years since our last tour, but we all realize we're stronger as a unit."


"We believed we had something pretty special from a vocal standpoint," says Teddy, "and we were looking for the opportunity to prove it. There were a lot of times when we wondered whether we might be better off going back home and getting jobs, but we just kept rehearsing and writing songs, trying to get better and believing we could do it."


"I went to see them at The Bowery," says Shedd, "and the sound that these three guys could create together was just really something. I saw the crowd reacting to music they'd never heard before as though they had. They were doing some covers, but a lot of the ALABAMA show at the time was original material, including stuff that wound up on the first three albums we did together."


The fact that some of the heirs of that legacy--Eli Young Band, Rascal Flatts and Florida Georgia Line--are among the stars paying tribute on Alabama & Friends is part of their legacy as surely as the awards and plaudits they've earned through the years. And those, of course, have been legion. They include more than 150 major industry nods, including two Grammys, the Minnie Pearl Humanitarian award, Entertainer of the Year awards three times from the CMA and five times from the ACM, as well as the latter's Artist of the Decade award. They earned 21 Gold , Platinum and Multi-Platinum albums and were named the RIAA's Country Group of the Century.


"I was in Nashville," he says, "walking by this club full of young people--I'm talking 18 or 20. The band started playing 'Dixieland Delight' and everybody in the place started singing and sang all the way through. I had to smile at the longevity of the songs. Maybe some of those kids didn't even know who ALABAMA was, but they knew the music, and so I think that's a tribute to the fact that we spent a career putting out good songs that stand the test of time."


When not playing with Alabama, Teddy enjoys spending time with his family and directing operations at his Bent Tree Farms. After receiving his first check from RCA records in 1980 for $61,000, he asked his wife Linda what he should do with the money. She answered, "What means the most to you?" "Why don't you buy your grandfathers farm--where you were raised, because I know you love the old place."


In 1985, Jeff, along with Albert Lee and Steve Morse were named the top three guitarists by Guitar Player Magazine's Reader Poll. Jeff plays electrifying lead guitar, and all of those "hot licks" on the fiddle you hear are Jeff, too. Between the guitar and fiddle you would think Jeff stays pretty busy. Well, 'Mr. Energy' has been deemed the "workhorse" of the group AND also plays keyboards, bass and mandolin. In his time off the road and in addition to music, Jeff enjoys coming to Fort Payne to work on electronics projects, go bass fishing, watch TV, and work in his recording studio, Cook Sound Studios.


Since Alabama left the road in 2004, Jeff did not miss a beat forming the Allstar Goodtime Band (AGB). Jeff and this eight piece band have several CD's out which include several number one songs on the Independent charts. "Having a horn section has enabled us to widen the scope of our music" Jeff says.


We welcome you to come into the Fan Club Museum and gift shop, there is no charge to browse and we enjoy meeting our fans! The merchandise we offer changes with each time of the season and with each album release. Some of the merchandise includes: pencils, pens, photos, hatpins, T-shirts, caps, jackets and the list goes on.


This interactive public art exhibition fuses art and technology to echo our troubled relationship with the planet. Four large-scale interactive pieces can be physically explored on the LED screens on Jerry Moss Plaza, while a fifth collective artw...Show more This interactive public art exhibition fuses art and technology to echo our troubled relationship with the planet. Four large-scale interactive pieces can be physically explored on the LED screens on Jerry Moss Plaza, while a fifth collective artwork extends the experience online. Using face, hand and full body tracking, Our Common Home allows users to influence digital artworks in real time, while exploring how our individual decisions have a global impact.


The best throwback songs can take you time-traveling and bring back memories of an earlier era, usually 15-20 years before. Throwback songs are those that it seems everyone can sing along with that instantly make you think of the time you first heard them played on the radio.


Add Club House Shepherd's Pie seasoning mix to water. Combine with cooked ground beef. Top with mashed potatoes and bake. For crispier potatoes score the top of the mash with a fork and switch the oven to broil for the last couple minutes of cooking.


Prohibition of alcohol began in 1920, this lead to an underground market for much sought after drinks and the creation of places like speakeasies. Speakeasies started out small, but as the Roaring Twenties came into its prime, speakeasies followed and expanded into clubs that featured musicians and dancers. Speakeasies weren't the only places that offered a party during the Jazz Age, there were private clubs, dance clubs, jazz clubs, and roadhouses. All were places where people could gather, listen to new music, and try out the latest dance crazes together. Dancing was a large part of popular culture and music during this decade and there were a number of iconic dances to emerge from these scenes. Dancing represented the carefree and excessive leisurely lifestyles that many had and tried to emulate during one of the first huge boom periods of American History. Nearly every town in the country had some form of dance band and a place to gather, making dance music some of the most widely heard and accepted music to come out of the 1920s. Dance music laid the foundation for what would become classic pop standards. The "Charleston," the "Black Bottom," the "Shimmy," the "Foxtrot," and the "Lindy Hop" were some of the most popular dances of the time. Most dance music resembled what we would call Big Band today, but at the time it was considered Jazz and it had elements of the formerly popular Ragtime music. The most famous and recognizable dance from the twenties was the Charleston. The Charleston was introduced to the world in the 1923 Broadway show "Runnin' Wild." The was a song from the show called "The Charleston" and it was done in a style similar to Ragtime music. Ragtime music was popular up until the late 1910s and was a heavy influence on dance music of the early 1920s, while jazz heavily influenced dance music in the late 1920s. There were several bands and orchestras that had hits with dance music during the decade and many of them transitioned between different genres depending on what was the most popular at the time. Some examples of popular dance bands were Paul Whiteman and his Orchestra, the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra, Ben Bernie and his Orchestra, and the Nat Shilkret Orchestra. Another aspect of dance music in the 1920s was the dance competitions and marathons that were held across the country. Radio stations, stores, and other commercial operations would hold competitions for prizes where couples would compete in seeing who could dance for the longest, with some people dancing for days. Other competitions would feature scores of girls seeing who could dance the best Charleston for the longest. The popularity of dance music also influenced the fashions of the decade with looser fitting clothing like "Flapper" style dresses for women, and more casual sportswear for men becoming widespread. While these types of clothing were not necessarily created with dancing in mind, their easy fit and styles made them ideal for the flamboyant and active dancing that dominated the decade. 041b061a72


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